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Pest Control and Nuisance Animals

Pest animals and plants affect the lives of all Queenslanders. They degrade our natural resources, damage precious remnant vegetation, comprise biodiversity and interfere with human health and recreation.  Council provides the following information to assist residents in the management and regulation of pest and restricted species in Ipswich.

Pest animals

  • Pest or feral animals refers to a broad scope of animals.
  • They can be any domestic animal that has been allowed to go wild and has no owner (dogs, cats, pigs, horses, etc) or pest animals such as foxes, dingoes, and rabbits.
  • The state government, through the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 and Regulation 2003 has declared the following animals as pests and under the act, harbourage and breeding of these animals may attract penalties including payment of large fines:
  • Wild dog: other than a domestic dog (Canis familiarris)
  • European fox (Vulpes vulpes)
  • Feral pig (Sus scrofa)
  • European rabbit: domestic and wild breed (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

Wild dogs

Wilddogs

  • Common name: Dingo, wild dog, other than domestic dog
  • Scientific name: Canis familiaris dingo and Canis familiaris
  • Background information: Wild dog refers collectively to purebred dingoes, dingo hybrids and domestic dogs that have escaped or been deliberately released. They kill, harass or maim domestic animals and native wildlife, and in semi-urban areas, they may threaten human safety.
  • Local Distribution:
    • Goolman
    • Grandchester
    • Purga
    • Ripley
    • Rosewood
    • Springfield
    • Swanbank
    • White Rock

To report wild dog activity in your area, please contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 with necessary information including description and location.Dingo scalp bounty

European fox

Fox

  • Common name: European fox
  • Scientific name: Vulpes vulpes
  • Background Information: European foxes spread rapidly following their released in 1845 and are now present across Australia.  They are adaptable and found in a variety of habitats.  Foxes are opportunistic feeders which threaten the survival of many ground dwelling native animals.  In rural areas, they can kill lambs and goat kids, and in urban areas they are a pest due to their scavenging and predation of wildlife, poultry and domestic pets.  They would probably become a major vector of rabies should it enter Australia.
  • Local Distribution: Scattered throughout Ipswich, mainly in rural areas, however have been captured in urban areas.
  • Should you wish to make a request to report fox activity in your area, please contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 with necessary information including description and location.

Feral pigs

Pig

  • Common name: Feral pig
  • Scientific name: Sus scrofa
  • Background Information: Early settlers introduced domestic pigs, and subsequent accidental and deliberate releases resulted in the establishment of feral populations.  Feral pigs are suited to a range of habitats but prefer dense cover.  They are omnivorous, opportunistic feeders which kill and eat lambs, damage pasture and crops, and damage agricultural infrastructure.  They are carriers of endemic and exotic diseases.  Feral pigs have a significant impact on the natural environment through wallowing, digging and predation.
  • Local Distribution:
    • Mt Flinders
    • Redbank Plains
    • Tivoli

To report feral pig activity in your area, please contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 with necessary information including description and location.

European rabbit

Rabit

  • Common name: European rabbit (domestic and wild breeds)
  • Scientific name: Oryctolagus cuniculus
  • Background Information: Rabbits are one of Australia's major agricultural and environmental animal pests costing between $600 million and $1 billion annually.  They compete with native animals, destroy the landscape and are a primary cause of soil erosion by preventing regeneration of native vegetation.
  • Local Distribution:
    • Amberley
    • North Ipswich
    • Walloon
    • Wulkuraka
  • All introduced mammal species are prohibited as pets unless listed as exceptions. A sample of these prohibited mammals include:
    • Foxes
    • Squirrels
    • Ferrets/polecats/stoats
    • Rabbits
    • Hamsters
    • Monkeys/marmosets
    • Gerbils
    • Weasels
    • Dingoes

To report rabbit activity in your area, please contact the Darling Downs - Moreton Rabbit Board on (07) 4661 4076 with the necessary information including description and location. For further information on rabbits please visit Darling Downs Moreton Rabbit Board and visit the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry site for further information about declared pests.

Nuisance Animals

Ants

  • Council does not treat ant infestations on privately owned land - if you are experiencing an ant problem on your property, the nest will need to be located and destroyed.
  • The most effective treatment is to purchase a suitable chemical from a hardware or produce store, mix it as per the instructions on the label and flood the nest.
  • There are many different types of ants, the most common are: Green Head Ant, Meat Ant, Sugar Ant and Funnel Ant.

Should you wish to make a request to report an ant issue on Council land (such as parks), please contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 with necessary information including description and location.

Fire ants

  • Fire ants are small, around 2-6 mm long and are reddish/brown and black in colour.
  • Their nests vary in shape and size, reaching up to 40 cm in height.
  • When disturbed, fire ants can become every aggressive and agitated - if bitten by fire ants, seek medical attention immediately.
  • The Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries is the leading agent for control, treatment and management of all fire ants in Queensland.

For further information on fire ants please visit the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry website.Bees

  • Should you wish to make a request to report a nuisance caused by a swarm of bees on Council property, please contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 with necessary information including details of the nuisance and location.  Council will not treat swarms (defined as a cluster or flying mass of bees, including workers, queen and drones) on privately-owned land.
  • Contact the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry regarding registration, overcrowding and/or disease enquiries relating to beehives on 13 25 23.  If goods (equipment, honey, wax etc) are being sold on a commercial basis, you must contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 to ensure you have completed the necessary documentation and gained approval to conduct business from your property.

Should you encounter swarms of bees that are a nuisance on your land, contact your local pest control service provider or the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry on 13 25 23 for a list of beekeepers who may charge a fee for eradication of bees.

Flies

  • Council does not treat flies on privately owned land - if you encounter flies making a nuisance on private property, contact your local pest control service.

If flies are causing a nuisance on Council land or on private land due to breach of Council regulations (waste mismanagement, food premises, etc) please contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 with details of the nuisance, including address and location.

Insects

Cockroach infestation

Council does not treat cockroaches on privately owned land - for management of cockroaches, contact your local pest control service.

Flea infestation

  • Council does not treat fleas on privately owned land - for management of fleas, contact your local pest control service.
  • If you wish to treat the problem, Council recommends you treat the animal with fleas and its bedding, the ground where the animal travels and rests, as well the interior of the house.

Midge and sandfly infestation

  • As breeding sites for midges and sandflies can not be accurately identified, no measures can be taken to control the immature stages of these pests.
  • Control of adults is not feasible as any area spraying will also kill all other insects that are contacted by the spray.
  • The best defence against midges and sandflies is to wear protective clothing and footwear, use repellents, operate fans when indoors, use mosquito coils and 240V plug-ins and seek advice from private pest controllers about the possibility of applying residual sprays around the residence.

Mosquitoes

  • Council has identified mosquito management as an important priority for the health and wellbeing of residents.  Mosquito control is regulated under the Public Health Act 2005 and Regulation.  Most of the major mosquito breeding sites in Ipswich have been identified and are routinely checked and treated if breeding is present.  Council uses chemicals that specifically targets mosquitoes and thus are environmentally friendly.  Mosquito treatment is generally only effective on mosquito larvae.
  • Council does not manage mosquito breeding and nuisance on private property.  Should you experience mosquito nuisance on your property, it is your responsibility to ensure breeding does not occur.  Mosquitoes need water to breed.  Pooling or ponding water that is stagnant (not flowing) has the potential to be a mosquito breeding site.  Mosquitoes can transfer vector borne diseases such as Ross River Virus, Barmah Forrest and Dengue Fever, and can cause heartworm in dogs.
  • For these reasons it is important that you do not allow mosquitoes to breed on your property. Most mosquito species are active around dusk and the two hours after dusk, but some species are active throughout the day.  They are more prolific in the summer months, breeding any time from October to April. If you are outside at dusk during summer ensure that you are wearing a loose fitting long shirt and pants and apply mosquito repellant.

Mosquito Facts

  • Mosquitoes can go from an egg to adult in one week in hot summer conditions
  • Breeding sites can include fresh, salt, clean or polluted water depending on the species
  • Healthy wetlands are not significant breeding sites as they support a balanced ecosystem containing natural predators of mosquito and its larvae
  • Females mosquitoes are the ones that bite as they need blood to develop eggs
  • Male mosquitoes feed on honeydew and nectar
  • Female mosquitoes can lay up to 200 eggs at a time
  • Mosquitoes find us by detecting warmth, moisture, carbon dioxide (which we breath out) and by sight at close distances

Is your backyard a mosquito paradise?

Mosquito control is regulated under the Public Health Act 2005 and Regulation and outlines requirements for eliminating breeding sites. The five major breeding sites around the home are:

  • Ponding water: pools of still and shallow water attract mosquitoes wishing to breed.  Fill them with soil or sand and plant over with grass or attractive plants.
  • Pot plant bases: the shallow warmed water in pot plant bases is ideal for mosquito breeding.  A pot plant base can support up to 150 mosquito larvae. Place sand in bases to absorb extra moisture and empty bases regularly, wiping each out with a cloth to remove mosquito eggs.
  • Roof guttering: clogged and unmaintained guttering prevents rainwater escaping. Keep tree branches away from gutters and check gutters for leaves and obstructions regularly.
  • Tyres: disused tyres are not only unsightly, they can hold water and provide an ideal warm site for mosquito breeding. Dispose of old tyres appropriately or store them undercover. Drill holes in tyres used as children's swings to allow water to drain.
  • Collections of rubbish: not only are collections of disused items around the home attractive to vermin such as rats and mice, they can hold small pools of water for mosquito breeding. Dispose of all disused items around the house at Council's transfer station and store items for future use in a tidy fashion, preferably undercover.
  • Ensure drums and other containers capable of holding water are stored upside down

Other potential breeding sites

  • Cavities in bricks
  • Water holding plants such as bromeliads and staghorns
  • Bird baths
  • Children's wading pools and swimming pools without chlorine
  • Boats and dinghies
  • Flower vases
  • Unstocked fish ponds.

Personal protection from mosquitoes

Screen windows and doors or use mosquito nets over beds and cots

  • Avoid going outside at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active
  • If you must go outside, use a repellant and wear loose long sleeved shirts and trousers
  • Air conditioning, fans, mosquito coils and plug in mosquito repellants can be used to discourage mosquitoes

To make a request regarding mosquito infestation on Council land, contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 with details of the infestation, including location, address and other necessary information.

Rodents, rats and vermin

  • Council does not manage rodent/vermin/rat problems and nuisance on private property.
  • Should you experience such nuisance on your property, contact your local pest control service.
  • If you require bait, visit a hardware, supermarket or produce store - Council no longer supplies rat bait to residents.
  • Overgrown vegetation or rubbish on a property can attract vermin - if the rat/vermin/rodent problems are due to the harbourage of vermin on your neighbour's property please visit the Neighbourhood Issues page for more information.

For more information view the rats and mice factsheet (under Resources below).

Spiders

Council does not treat spiders on privately owned land.  Contact your local pest control supplier for treatment of spiders on private property.  Spiders may differ in appearance and the amount of danger they pose, but the treatment for eradication is the same.  Tips to remove spiders from your home include:

  • Spray the spider directly (if possible) with insect/spider insecticide
  • If this is not possible, spray the entire web area, with any residual insecticide
  • Do not remove the web for two to three days
  • At that time, locate and destroy any egg sacks still on the web

To enquire about a spider problem on Council land, please contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 with details of the infestation, including location, breed (if known), and other supporting information.

Termites

  • Council does not treat termites on privately owned land - Contact your local pest control supplier for treatment of termites on private property.
  • If you believe you have termites on your property, it's a good idea to identify the termite as some do not attack wood in service, only wood that is breaking down.
  • As a result, some nests do not need to be treated as they will not cause problems.
  • When sourcing termite control from a pest controller, you may request a license number on any paperwork provided by the pest controller. This licence can be verified through the Environmental Health unit of Queensland Health on telephone 13 13 04.
  • Council will not treat termites on a footpath - termites are only treated by Council if they are found to be within a tree on the footpath area. Termites will be treated if found to be in a park or reserve nearby to residential areas.

To report termite nests on Council property or parks maintained by Council, please contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 with details of the infestation, including address, location, and extent of the problem.

Wasps

  • Council does not treat wasps on privately owned land - Contact your local pest control supplier for treatment of wasps on private property.
  • If you feel you can look after the problem yourself, here are some handy tips for the eradication of wasps (only attempt the following if you are comfortable and confident to do so), for small nests:
    • Approach the nest in the evening when wasps are ‘home'
    • If it is dark in the area, place red cellophane over the torch as wasps cannot see red light
    • Spray the nest with household insecticide and move quietly and slowly away from the area (wasps are attracted to movement).

To report wasps on Council property or parks maintained by Council, please contact Council on (07) 3810 6666 with details of the infestation, including address, location, and extent of the problem.

More information